Project Support

Astrological guidance by Luz Peuscovich

Project support by Staci Bu Shea




Luz Peuscovich




Luz Peuscovich is an Artist and Astrologer from Argentina who accompanies Falke Pisano from the astrological cosmovision, focusing on providing an integrative and bonding perspective.
Luz's work focuses on the integration of humans with nature (of the sky) and the development of sustainable human relationships.
The panoramic vision of the sky is used as a tool in the investigation of the internal states of the project participants, seeking to understand the relationships between humans in the current contexts. The metaphors provided by the symbols are poetic doors for the creation of narratives and interpretations that enrich and enhance sensitivity, and the search for shared patterns can help people to feel contained in situations that involve a lot of commitment and exposure. Seeking emotional contact, empathy and dialogue is fundamental to investigate in depth how we function in the social contexts we create and share.

To learn more about Luz’s work, visit luzpeuscovich.com



Staci Bu Shea




Credit: Staci Bu Shea, 2021 [Image description: fresh from being washed, a black t-shirt of a hospice guest, with the printed text "Trust the timing of your life" on the front, hangs on a dollie from a hanger. The shirt is drying faster in the warm space of the boiler room of the hospice, near the laundry machines, storage goods, and tools.]

Staci Bu Shea is a project companion to Where Should We Begin?. Staci supports the main organizers (Falke Pisano, Joanna Zielińska and Anne-Claire Schmitz) in their collaborative process of organizing and hosting the project and gives attention to the interpersonal experiences of their collective work. Meeting at the beginning, middle, and end of the project's span, we discuss roles, expectations, and values for common understanding, as well as topics of preventive care like communication styles, approaches to conflict, and accountability. These discussions are approached with the attitude that care is something incomplete, accessibility and safety imperfect. Instead, it is the intention and willingness to strive toward these “horizons” where deeper connection and transformation can take place in our relationships.

To learn more about Staci's work, visit stacibushea.info.



September

10 September: Love Doesn’t Pay the Bill. A conversation about values and economies in publishing as artistic practice

with Yin Yin Wong, Riet Wijnen and Falke Pisano

Yin Yin Wong ︎︎︎
Riet Wijnen ︎︎︎



Love Doesn’t Pay the Bill.
A conversation about values and economies in publishing as artistic practice


with Yin Yin Wong, Riet Wijnen and Falke Pisano



10 September 2022, 15:00-17:00
M HKA 6th floor

As we move from summer to autumn, the yearlong programme Where Should We Begin? does so as well. On the 10th of September, we invite you to join a series of short presentations, followed by a discussion, about the values and productive frictions in publishing as (part of) artistic practice.

During this event Yin Yin Wong, Riet Wijnen and Falke Pisano will share their experiences with publishing and introduce current intersections through two collaborative projects: Wong and Pisano are developing a publishing methodology as a part of Where should we begin? and Wijnen and Pisano are working on the children’s book Love Doesn’t Pay the Bill, based on the International Wages for Housework Campaign (a historical grassroots women's network campaigning for recognition and payment for all caring work founded in 1972). This book is made in collaboration with Simnikiwe Buhlungu and David Bennewith amongst others.

Wong, Wijnen and Pisano will speak about their different roles in the projects and about how they themselves view issues such as complexity and accessibility, editing and multiplicity and the different economies from production to distribution. They will also share how these considerations are reflected in the use of visual and spatial methods of editing, structuring and working with material.

trying out, left: Yin Yin Wong and Falke Pisano, right: Riet Wijnen and Falke Pisano

Yin Yin Wong is an artist, designer and researcher. They deal with questions surrounding ownership, agency, circulation and dissemination of visual culture in relation to the public space and public sphere. Interested in graphic design’s potential to be distributed widely; beyond museum walls, into public space, or even into homes, Wong challenges specific models or paradigms that operate on modes of exclusion within the arts and the distribution of (visual) culture and practices this through site specific installation, (social) sculpture, public intervention and publishing.

Wong was the director of Publication  Studio Rotterdam from 2015 to 2021 and is currently a participant at the Jan van Eyck Academie, Maastricht.

Riet Wijnen is an artist whose practice involves sculpture, photograms, working through texts, woodcuts and more recently, type design. She is interested in incomplete histories of abstraction, and what and who are already there in ways we might not yet know. Wijnen looks to elders, hosts practitioners from the past and present within her work who have been active in the field of art during early modernism, or in science, philosophy, education and activism. Bringing them together through fictional conversations and sculptures to reconsider histories and better understand what comes next, Wijnen centers perception, language and organizational structures.

This research comes together in the cycle Sixteen Conversations on Abstraction (2015) and publications related to language and biographies of female modernists that provide sources for her practice while functioning independently, such as Saloua Raouda Choucair (2022), Homophone Dictionary (2019), Grace Crowley (2019), Abstraction Création: Art non-figuratif (reprint and translation) (2014) and Marlow Moss (2013).




August

Start August: Launch of audio piece by RA Walden, ɦej jala uθɪjeɽadjaθa / if the body is willing, 2022

RA Walden has made a new audio piece for Where should we begin? which is now available for listening.


ɦej jala uθɪjeɽadjaθa / if the body is willing

a fragmented audio offering featuring entangled moments from RA Walden’s project ẍây ithřa, a guided meditation by Clay “onion” AD, and voiceover by Harley Aussoleil.

︎ AUDIO HERE (anchor) and HERE (spotify)

︎ TRANSCRIPT HERE (pdf)

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July

6-7 June: work meeting with Yin Yin Wong and installation prints RA Walden

9 July: Installation intervention Karen Vantvelt



Yin Yin Wong & Falke Pisano, publishing structure



Artist, designer and publisher Yin Yin Wong and I have begun collaborating on a publishing methodology, which after summer will gain some form in the space, to open up the research, the different processes and conversations that currently take place in an accessible way. This will lead to a production process or structure for the publishing of different voices and kinds of texts, throughout the second part of the year. We will share some insights into the complexities of publishing during a public event in September, together with the artist Riet Wijnen (with whom I am currently developing a children’s book based on the International Wages for Housework Campain, a grassroots women's network campaigning for recognition and payment for all caring work).

As an artist, designer and researcher Yin Yin Wong deals with questions surrounding ownership, agency, circulation and dissemination of visual culture in relation to the public space and public sphere.  Interested in graphic design’s potential to be distributed widely; beyond museum walls, into public space, or even into homes, Wong challenges specific models or paradigms that operate on modes of exclusion within the arts and the distribution of (visual) culture and practices this through site specific installation, (social) sculpture, public intervention and publishing.


RA Walden, ẍây ithřa, 2021



The artist RA Walden presents a new language: ẍây ithřa. The project was initiated in response to the restrictive nature of the English language. Formulated over a period of months in close collaboration with the linguist Margaret Ransdell Green, ẍây ithřa consists of a 300+ word lexicon, complete with morphosyntax, phonology, and an ever-growing set of idioms. Drawing on the rich histories of queering lexicon, from argots and cants, to anti-languages and the use of constructed language within Sci-Fi and speculative fiction, Walden seeks to bring fluidity, ease and ‘access intimacy’ to those in sick, disabled and trans bodies. The artist uses world-building, not as a visionary tool for an imagined future, but as an embodied methodology for the ‘now’. As part of Superhost, we present prints and a workshop in the form of a podcast explaining the principles of the language ẍây ithřa.

I encountered this work at Kunstinstituut Melly in Rotterdam in summer 2021. It was commissioned as part of 84 Steps. The work and events within 84 STEPS give special attention to the relation between physical and mental architectures, as much as with interpretations of personal and social health. I felt it was crucial to include this work in a project that aims at investigating the consequences of the current organization of labour and value production within the art institutional field.

RA Walden’s techniques span text, sculpture, printed matter, performance and video, all of which is undertaken with a socially engaged and research-led working methodology. Walden’s works question contemporary Western society’s relationship with care, tenderness and fragility in relation to our bodies, our communities and our failing ecosystems. They explore these issues through the lenses of crip theory, queer theory, sci-fi, speculative fiction and disobedient archives. Recent work has sought to disturb overly simplistic understandings of the disabled body, looking to bring an ethic of care, a connection between the land and the body, and a cripped concept of performance into conversation with the work.



One of RA Walden’s prints with a caption that refers back to Katja Mater’s Time is an Arrow, Error series. Three small series of clockalikes selected by association and affection where present in the spaces from February to May. 


Karen Vantvelt – (s)he –, wat dragen we hier binnen? (what are we carrying/wearing in here?), 2022



Karen Vantvelt – (s)he – has added an intervention in response to the blue modular gate that I installed between the two spaces on the 6th floor. wat dragen we hier binnen? (What are we carrying/wearing in here?) consists of the artist’s clothes and other silkscreened textiles squeezed between the wall and the entrance-gate. In her work with clothes, textiles and performance Vantvelt searches for ways to communicate about complex and difficult experiences and feelings within shame and shyness. The collaboration stems from our conversations about the interaction between trauma and institutions and the experience of working and studying at the threshold of art (educational) institutions, in continuous negotiation with the existing institutional practices.

(s)he

(s)he lives inside
(s)he lives
(s)he lives a life
alive
her head is gone
her words are found
(s)he becomes

(s)he extended her legs towards the walls , and her fingers into an emotional layer of a hidden body . the body is stuck . you can call her he , but (s)he has breasts , doesn’t like bread and grew up in the West . Belgium rooted , but (s)he is not rooted , could not escape , but tries to . needs some help but isn’t helpless . (s)he cares without knowing , (s)he lives without growing . (s)he is made from clay . not found at an archeological sound , but sounds like the digital world behind . ( words . )

cries ( sometimes ) hides ( sometimes ) but mostly hangs around smiling .

(s)he is . (s)he is alive . but does (s)he know where (s)he is right now ?





June

3 June: Installation of video Simnikiwe Buhlungu

21 June: Session Staci Bu Shea (Falke)


Artist contribution to HART Magazine on invitation of Jessica Gysel 

HART magazine ︎︎︎
For pdf ︎︎︎







Projected on the freestanding screen on wheels we installed a film by Simnikiwe Buhlungu, My Dear Kite (You Can But You Can’t) – Late Yawnings. Recorded during the pandemic, the work attempts to make sense of the socio-cultural consequences that arise during times of confusion and uncertainty, as well as the artist’s bodily and geographic [dis]placement from Johannesburg, South Africa, having recently moved to The Netherlands. The work raises questions about what it means to be a creative practitioner, to stay productive and the (in)ability to respond artistically.

I saw this video during one of the few openings I attended last summer, in the group exhibition A future unknown to me except as the whisper of a plea, curated by Sergi Rusca at Ellen de Bruijne Projects in Amsterdam. I remember having quite a visceral reaction, it’s a super short video with a broad register of emotion and situated reflection.

The video was published on 30 April 2020 as part of "Artists in Quarantine" a project initiated by L'Internationale.

Simnikiwe Buhlungu. My Dear Kite (You Can But You Can't) - Late Yawnings 01h43 from L'internationale online on Vimeo


Simnikiwe Buhlungu is an artist from Johannesburg, South Africa. With a keen interest in how knowledge is produced, by whom and how it is disseminated, Buhlungu locates both socio-historical and everyday phenomena by navigating these questions and their inexhaustible potential answers. Through this process, she maps points of cognisance, i.e. How do we come to know?,     which situate various layers of awareness as syncopated and reverberated ecologies. Lately, she has been listening to mbaqanga music, thinking about apiaries, and seeking contributions to Simunye Resource Works, a publishing house that is forever yet-to-exist.


I see / You Mean in HART magazine #225
Falke Pisano: Where should we begin?
Each month Jessica Gysel invites an artist to occupy space under the title I See / You Mean. A nod to the title of the 1970 "collage novel" by New York writer Lucy Lippard, an editorial snapshot, a "carte blanche" with an open ending.

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